Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Saturday he "remains open" to overhauling Canada's first-past-the-post voting system if re-elected, "provided there's more consensus on the issue." With only two days before Canadians head to the polls, Trudeau clearly wished to keep his attention firmly fixed on the battle for last-minute votes.

Trudeau first raised the possibility of electoral reform in 2015, promising it would be the last to use the first-past-the-post method — a promise he ended up breaking. In a tight election campaign, electoral reform hasn't attracted too much attention.

In his remarks, Trudeau opposed a system of proportional representation because "it gives more weight to smaller parties that are perhaps 'fringe' parties." Instead, he threw his support behind the ranked choice ballot.

"I have always been a fan of ranked ballots where people get to choose the first choice, second choice, third choice," he said.  "I think it forces parties to come together and make a pitch to be the second choice of other voters, and therefore they are less divisive."

However, the prime minister emphasized the issue was a "low priority" and that 'consensus' would be key.

"If ever there is more of a consensus, it could be interesting to follow up on, and I'd be open to that because I've never flinched in my desire for ranked ballots," he added.

"I have always been a fan of ranked ballots where people get to choose first choice, second choice, third choice," he said during a campaign stop in Aurora, Ontario. "I think it forces parties to come together and make a pitch to be the second choice of other voters, and therefore they are less divisive."

Trudeau has been coy in recent days about his own post-election future, adding he wants to concentrate on Monday’s vote and not engage in speculation.

But on Saturday, Trudeau said he’s not done with putting forward his agenda on issues such as climate change, affordable child care and protecting seniors, adding he’s enthusiastic "not only for the days to come, but the years to come together."

"There is lots of work still to do, and I’m nowhere near done yet," he said.