Barstool Sports founder Dave Portnoy is fighting back against accusations that he had rough-but-consensual sex with several women by showing messages from his accusers that cast doubt on the Business Insider hit piece.

In a livestream, Portnoy displayed messages Thursday from the women, showing they wanted to see him again or admitting that the narrative that the sex was somehow not consensual is false. Two of the accusers were given pseudonyms, identified as Allison and Madison, but Portnoy was able to figure out who they were based on bare details provided in the Business Insider article.

Portnoy produced messages from Allison where she said she "really want[s] to see you" and that she "would do anything." Allison again messaged Portnoy, asking what he was up to that day and questioning, "Okay can we bang"?

Afterwards, Portnoy asked her how the "bragging" went and Allison responded: "Amazing I got the word around too," adding a winking emoji. She later said she was "in shock that ur still dming me [right now]… like whats up dave portnoy."

As for the other accuser, the sports media mogul produced replies Madison made to comments on a TikTok video she created where she stated: "The article never said the sex wasn't consensual" and "nobody said he was a rapist."

Portnoy was suspended from Twitter for sharing an email exchange with the editor of Business Insider over the "rough sex" expose. In an Instagram story on Tuesday, the Barstool icon announced that he had been suspended from the platform for posting an email correspondence with Insider editor-in-chief Nicholas Carlson, which showed a Barstool staffer requesting that Carlson appear on Portnoy's video podcast to discuss the controversial Business Insider article.

"We'll make it as fair as possible and you can bring as many people as possible as you'd like," the email invite to Carlson reads. "You can video/record the whole conversation and repost for your own purposes."

Carlson replied by declining the formal invitation on "The Dave Portnoy Show," stating that Business Insider wanted the lengthy report to "speak for itself."

"Nothing like 'journalists' who write slanderous hit pieces, put it behind a paywall, use it as marketing to make money and then refuse to defend their work," Portnoy captioned the email receipts in a Monday post. "There is clear evidence that refutes their 'reporting' that @businessinsider refuses to acknowledge."

"Meanwhile I'm an open book," Portnoy added on Instagram.

Portnoy told Fox News in an interview Monday night that he will not be backing down on the matter, stating that "it's guilty until proven innocent" in American culture. "They [the media outlets that published the story] won't even discuss it. They print and run. They print and run. It's disgusting and it's character assassination, My lawyers have said just let it go; it'll go away," Portnoy said.

"I'm not going to let it go because this behavior—I've never been attacked like this. I've been attacked for two decades, but never escalated to this length and, frankly, it's scary. I didn't know that you could do this," Portnoy said to Tucker Carlson.

Carlson and Portnoy speculated in the Fox News primetime segment that the Business Insider story was published as part of a conspiracy to tank the stock of Penn National Gaming, which owns a 36 percent stake in Barstool Sports.